Blog

Essay On Human Rights

In: Popular topics September 22nd, 2016

Human rights essay should be written on the basis of interesting and truthful information. Essay human rights you should write in case if you have enough knowledge on this topic and we hope that this one will inspire you. Human rights are inalienable rights of every person, regardless of nationality, place of residence, gender, ethnicity, color, religion, language or any other sign. All people are equal when it comes to human rights, eliminating all kinds of discrimination. These rights are interrelated, interdependent and indivisible. Universal human rights are often fixed and guaranteed by law in the form of treaties, customary international law, general principles of law and other sources of international law. The international law of human rights imposes on the State's obligation to implement activities to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms.

The principle of universality of human rights, according to Wikipedia, is the basis of the international law of human rights. This principle, which was first to acquire special significance with the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948, became a permanent feature in numerous international conventions, declarations and resolutions relating to human rights. For example, in Vienna at the World Conference on Human Rights in 1993, it was noted that the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms - it is the duty of the state, it does not depend on its political, economic and cultural system.

Each state has ratified at least one of the main contracts in the field of human rights, and 80% of States have ratified four or more such treaties, which reflects the general consensus among the States in the relevant field, imposes legal obligations on them, and affirms the principle of universality. Some of the basic standards of human rights are secured by customary international law. Human rights are inalienable. A person can not be deprived of them, except for rare cases and in accordance with due process. For example, the right to liberty can be restricted if a person found guilty of committing a crime in the court.

All human rights are a single unit, they are interrelated and interdependent: whether civil and political rights such as the right to live, equality in the eyes of the law and freedom of expression; economic, social and cultural rights, such as the right to work, social security and education, or collective rights, such as the right to development and self-determination. Progress in the observance of one right contributes to progress in the observance of the rights of others. Likewise, failure to comply with one right adversely affects the enjoyment of other rights.

The principle of non-discrimination is a comprehensive principle of international law on human rights. This principle is present in all major instruments relating to human rights, and is the central theme of some international human rights conventions, such as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. The principle of non-discrimination applies to every person and covers all human rights and freedoms, avoiding discrimination on any of the features, such as sex, race, color or any other trait. The principle of non-discrimination is complemented by the principle of equality that is established in article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: "All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights."

In accordance with international law, states commit themselves to respect, protect and fulfill human rights. Respect for human rights implies the non-interference of the state in the exercise of human rights and refraining from restricting rights. Human rights obligation requires States to prevent violations. Implementation of human rights obliges the state to guarantee the smooth implementation of basic human rights. At the individual level, everyone should respect the rights of others.